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Trim / Split

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Generally speaking, the Trim/ Split tool creates a division in the selected timeline item at the point in time determined by the current position of the playhead, resulting in either one or two shortened items. Audio extraction, and freeze frame insertion are also possible with this tool. The Trim/ Split tool has 5 possible options depending on context.

 

Trim to left of playhead - Create a division in the selected item, discarding the portion to the left of the playhead, while retaining the portion to the right. The remaining clip is repositioned to start at the current position of the playhead.

 

Trim to right of playhead - Create a division in the selected item, discarding the portion to the right of the playhead, while retaining the portion to the left. There is no change in the start time of the item.

 

Split at playhead - Create a division in the selected item, retaining both pieces on either side of the playhead as separate items. There is no change in the start time of either item.

 

Extract Audio - Removes audio from a selected video clip and places it as an item on the secondary timeline, synchronized with the selected video clip.

 

Split and Insert Freeze Frame - Create a division in the selected item, retaining both pieces on either side of the playhead as separate items with the current frame inserted as an image between them. The playhead is moved to the last frame of the inserted image. The image duration is equal to the Default Photo Duration as specified in the Project Settings.

 

 

 

KineMaster Tip: What is actually happening when I split a video clip?

 

Video clips aren’t reencoded when they are split. In fact the original media file isn’t touched at all. When you split a clip, KineMaster makes a copy of the clip on the timeline (but it still refers to the original media) and trims it to match up where the split occurred. Everything else is handled in export.

 

 

 

KineMaster Tip: What is an IDR interval warning?

 

This is quite rare, but very occasionally, when editing clips, you may run across and error stating that the IDR interval is “too large.” An IDR interval is the time between IDR frames. When encoding H.264 video, a given video frame can be stored in two different ways:

 

  • As the difference (changes) from the another frame (usually the preceding frame, but not always)
  • As a new fully encoded frame (IDR frame)

 

As you might guess, storing the difference from another frame takes a lot less space.

 

On the other hand, if you want to start playing from someplace that's not the beginning of the video, you need to start from a full frame (an IDR frame) and work forward to the point you want to play from, which could technically be the start of the video. In that case, calculating frame content would take far too much time to be useful.

 

From testing, it was determined that nearly all devices can decode video quickly enough to support real-time previews of video with IDR frame intervals as high as 4 seconds (even when using video layers). But over 4 seconds, this can become problematic, depending on the video resolution and the device. For this reason, to be safe, if the IDR interval is over 4 seconds, we show a warning to let you know there may be some interruptions while editing it.


For more information, please visit https://support.kinemaster.com/hc/en-us/articles/210294623-What-is-an-IDR-interval-and-why-is-it-sometimes-too-large-

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